|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | World (Click here for more)

“Circumstances” Could Alter India’s “No First Use” Nuclear Policy

NEW DELHI – India’s Defense Minister Rajnath Singh said on Friday that his country could change its “no first use” nuclear policy in the future should the circumstances required it.

Singh’s comments come at a time of escalated tensions with neighboring Pakistan following last week’s scrapping of the special status of Jammu and Kashmir.

Singh visited Pokhran in western India on Friday to offer a tribute to former Prime Minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee on his first death anniversary.

In 1998, India carried out five nuclear tests to showcase India’s nuclear potential in Pokhran while Vajpayee was prime minister.

The tests triggered a response from Pakistan, which carried out five nuclear tests in the southwest of the country.

“Pokhran is the area which witnessed Atal Ji’s firm resolve to make India a nuclear power and yet remain firmly committed to the doctrine of ‘No First Use’,” Singh tweeted on Friday.

“What happens in future depends on the circumstances,” the minister added, leaving the road open to a change of stance in a country that, according to him, has always been “responsible nuclear nation.”

With the nuclear tests of 1998, India and Pakistan showed their nuclear capabilities to the world, something that, according to analysts, had a deterrent effect, avoiding a large-scale war between the two countries.

As part of this strategy, India refused to sign the first treaty on the prohibition of nuclear weapon in 2017 and said that it should not be subjected to a legally-binding obligation based on the proposal.

In the treaty, which will enter into force once it is ratified by 50 countries, the signatories commit to not developing, acquiring, storing, using or threaten to use nuclear weapons and other explosive nuclear devices.

Singh’s comments come amid escalated tensions between India and Pakistan following the Indian government’s decision to revoke Article 370.

Islamabad responded to the action with the “downgrading” of diplomatic relations, the suspension of bilateral trade and made an appeal to the United Nations Security Council for an emergency meeting over India’s decision.

The two countries have fought two wars and have had numerous conflicts over the disputed Kashmir region ever since the partition of the subcontinent and independence from the British Empire in 1947.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2019 © All rights reserved