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  HOME | World (Click here for more)

UK Leader Offers Politicians Chance to Vote on Second Brexit Referendum

LONDON – British Prime Minister Theresa May said on Tuesday that Parliament could be given a vote on holding a second referendum on the country’s exit from the European Union.

The conservative leader set out a package of measures in a bid to win support from members of the Labour Party opposition to back her deal on the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the EU.

Her agreement has already been rejected on three occasions.

The new agreement that May presented included a temporary customs union with the EU, until the next general election in the UK, as well as guarantees to maintain labor rights and environmental standards.

She warned that the Brexit law, which will reach Parliament during the first week of June, represents the “last opportunity” for members of parliament to “meet the outcome” of the June 2016 referendum.

The most Eurosceptic sector of the Conservatives and their partners of the Northern Ireland Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) were opposed to the terms of the divorce agreed with Brussels.

The obstacles to achieving the support of her own party have led her to take “the difficult decision” of trying to reach an agreement with other parties, she added.

Although talks with the Labour Party did not lead to a specific agreement, they facilitated a rapprochement of positions in various areas, the Tory leader continued.

The point of greatest tension was the creation of a customs union with the EU after Brexit, a model of future commercial relationship advocated by Labour.

May went back to show contrary to that proposal, considering that it would prevent the United Kingdom from forging its own commercial policy but accepts to vote on the possibility of establishing a customs union for the temporary exchange of goods, until the next elections, scheduled for 2022.

Some Labour members have called for a second referendum so that the British public can decide the terms of exit from the EU in case Parliament ratifies them.

May expressed opposition to another public vote but announced that the text of the Brexit law will allow the House of Commons to rule on whether it wants to call another referendum.

 

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