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  HOME | World (Click here for more)

Pro-Independence Activists Chained to Catalan Court Arrested

BARCELONA – A dozen activists who had chained themselves to a court in the northeastern Spanish region of Catalonia to protest the imprisonment of pro-independence figures were on Friday arrested.

Police sources confirmed to EFE that the 12 detained formed the nucleus of a group of about 80 people who were attempting to block the entrance of the High Court of Justice of Catalonia to demand freedom for people such as former regional vice president Oriol Junqueras, who faces charges of rebellion and sedition for his role last year in a referendum and subsequent declaration of independence deemed illegal by Spain.

The protest was called by the Committees for the Defense of the Republic, a network of groups of volunteers that aim to protect and uphold the region’s declaration of independence.

Images by the EFE photographer showed police carrying huge bolt cutters and trying to pry the activists away from their post, though a majority of the protesters were sitting on the steps, some holding guitars or wearing clown noses, alongside a sign that urged people to “stop the coup d’etat.”

The sign referred to the Spanish state’s application of Article 155 of the Constitution, which saw the region’s autonomy reeled back, its government dissolved and fresh elections called, a move which some pro-independence hardliners saw as an attack on a fledgling sovereign republic.

 

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