|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | World (Click here for more)

UN, NGOs Demand Child Soldier Recruitment Ban, 300,000 Children at Risk

MADRID – Non-governmental organizations and the United Nations showed their solidarity Monday in support of the International Day Against the Use of Child Soldiers.

Every year since Feb. 12, 2002, they have called on all states to end the forceful, often brutal, conscription of some 300,000 children worldwide as child soldiers.

“Sometimes they are forcefully recruited but others volunteer compelled to do so by hunger or after becoming war-orphans,” Pedro Puig, president of the Spanish NGO, Aldeas Infantiles SOS, told EFE.

Children are often used by warring factions in supporting roles such as couriers or informants but also as human bombs in terror attacks or as sex slaves, NGO’s have said.

Some 16 years ago, the “Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the involvement of children in armed conflict” was signed in a bid to ban the use of children in some 30 global conflicts, also elevating the minimum recruitment age to 18 years.

On the other hand, the NGO World Vision reports that children are more often lured into recruitment by armed forces by simply lying to them with false promises of food, education and safety, at a time their young lives seem to offer no other option.

“We listen to how these children got involved in these conflicts and it’s heartbreaking: they are given false promises of free education, no more hunger or safety for their families and communities,” the NGO stated.

They narrate stories such as that of Hain, a former child soldier aged 16 who was told to either kill or be killed and forced to join a Myanmar armed group.

Or that of Ngalula, aged 12, from the Democratic Republic of Congo, who confided to a girlfriend she either joined the militias or faced execution.

Among the guidelines seeking to eradicate this brutal activity is improved access to education in conflict areas, supporting the role of children in rebuilding peace and involving local religious and community leaders.

Some 167 countries have ratified the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the involvement of Children in Armed Conflict seeking to set 18 years as the minimum recruitment age into armed forces and to ban children’s direct involvement in any armed conflict.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2018 © All rights reserved