|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | World (Click here for more)

Johnson Meets Myanmar’s Suu Kyi after Visiting Displaced Rohingyas

BANGKOK – British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson met his Burmese counterpart and de facto leader of the Myanmar government, Aung San Suu Kyi, in Naypyidaw on Sunday, a day after a visit to refugee camps in east Bangladesh sheltering around 690,000 Rohingyas fleeing violence in Myanmar.

Suu Kyi, who was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1991, received Johnson in the main meeting room of the foreign ministry on Sunday morning, the Myanmar ministry posted on its official Facebook page.

In a statement ahead of the visit, the British Foreign Secretary said he would be “talking to State Counselor Aung San Suu Kyi and other regional leaders about how we can work together to resolve this appalling crisis.”

On Saturday, Johnson visited Cox’s Bazar in Bangladesh to hear firsthand the persecutions allegedly suffered by the members of the mostly Muslim minority at the hands of Burmese security forces.

The UK minister described the current situation as “one of the most shocking humanitarian disasters of our time” and said his aim was to achieve a “safe, dignified return” for the Rohingya refugees.

Human rights organizations have documented widespread abuse by the Myanmar army against the Rohingyas, including killings and rapes, during its military campaign against the minority, which the United Nations has described as a “textbook example of ethnic cleansing.”

The Myanmar army denies the allegations, although in January, it admitted to a case of extrajudicial killings of Rohingyas, who were buried in a mass grave in western Myanmar’s Rakhine state, where the ethnic minority has been living for centuries.

In November, Bangladesh and Myanmar signed an agreement to begin repatriating Rohingya refugees by the end of January, but Dhaka suspended it at the last minute.

On Sunday, Johnson was due to visit the Maungdaw township in Rakhine on the Bangladeshi border, where resettlement camps are being built ahead of the potential repatriation of the Rohingya refugees.

Members of the mostly Muslim minority community are not recognized by Myanmar’s authorities, who consider them Bengali migrants, and refuse to grant them citizenship.

Their plight worsened in 2012 following the outbreak of sectarian violence between the minority and the Buddhist majority in Rakhine, which left around 120,000 Rohingyas living in camps for displaced people in that state.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2018 © All rights reserved