|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | World (Click here for more)

Cape Town Pushes “Day Zero” to May 11, When Most Taps Shut Off amid Drought

JOHANNESBURG – Local authorities in Cape Town postponed on Monday “Day Zero” from April 16 until May 11 following cuts in consumption by the agricultural sector, pushing back the date when most taps are to be turned off due to the South African city’s severe water shortage.

“Day Zero” is when dam levels reach 13.5 percent and residents must line up for water from distribution points; currently dam levels are at 25.85 percent, according to the City of Cape Town’s official website.

Deputy Mayor Ian Neilson explained in a statement that the agriculture sector, which currently uses 30 percent of the water supply, is expected to reduce its share to 15 percent in March and 10 percent in April.

Many people in Cape Town’s poorest areas had already relied on communal water sources for their day-to-day needs, but as “Day Zero” approaches, rich and poor alike have turned to collecting water from other sources, such as mountain springs.

The severe drought that plagues the South African capital is an unusual phenomenon, since it is not only caused by the scarcity of rainfall that characterized the last rainy season (April-October), but also because the level of rainfall has been also particularly low during the last two years.

According to data from the World Health Organization, about 100 liters of water are spent on showering for just five minutes.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2018 © All rights reserved