|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | World (Click here for more)

European Union School in Lebanon Offers Hope to Palestinian Child Refugees

BEDDAWI, Lebanon – Children trying to forge a future and live as normal a life as possible within a stiflingly crowded Palestinian refugee camp in northern Lebanon today face a much brighter future than previously envisaged, with access to health care and education, thanks to funding from the European Union, EFE reported Friday.

A school set among the narrow streets of the populous Beddawi refugee camp near the northwestern Lebanese port city of Tripoli harbors some 682 pupils aged between 6-12 years, most of whom are Palestinian, though there are also some Kurdish and Syrian children who attend, as corroborated by a delegation of Members of the European Parliament.

“We learn here and we derive great benefit from the knowledge we acquire,” said 10-year-old Amina, who has a yearning to become a doctor when she grows up.

Each classroom of the school, which is administered by the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestinian Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA) and was recently renovated by the EU, can accommodate between 40-46 children.

The institution also has a library, as well as capacities to teach children with special needs, including those with dyslexia or problems with their sight or hearing.

Lebanon, a relatively small country, nearly 50 times smaller than Spain, has the most refugees per capita in the world, and according to the UNRWA, there are some 450,000 Palestinian refugees there.

Meanwhile, the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) has estimated there are about 1 million Syrians who have fled to Lebanon due to civil war.

Portuguese member of the European Parliament Marisa Matias, who visited the camp recently as part of an EP delegation, acknowledged that help offered by the UN and EU was “not enough” and “poverty and unemployment are very high.”

Speaking to EFE in an exclusive telephone interview, she said that EU money had also been invested in refurbishing a much-needed health center.

“The UNRWA must take on a growing demand for services at the camp that over the years has become an urban neighborhood,” she told EFE.

Despite its difficulties, Matias said the camp was a successful example of how the UNRWA could support Palestinian refugees with the help of EU money.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2018 © All rights reserved