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  HOME | World (Click here for more)

France Turns to Army for Help in Flooding as Seine Continues to Rise

PARIS – Flooding in northern France forced the army to intervene on Wednesday as water levels were expected to rise further over the next few days.

A total of 23 departments in the north and northeast of the country were on orange alert for flooding and swelling rivers, according to the French meteorological service.

The mayor of Villeneuve-Saint-Georges, in the outskirts of Paris, told local media that military trucks had arrived to try and contain the overflowing Yerres and Seine rivers, particularly in two neighborhoods from where residents had to be evacuated on Tuesday.

Vigicrues, a national information service that warns of flood risks, said the Seine in Paris was expected to rise further, though it won’t be reaching levels as high as 2016, when flooding in the capital killed two people and caused over a billion euros ($1.2 billion) in damages.

The Louvre Museum had to close off the lower levels of its Islamic Arts section until Sunday due to the expected rise, though epa images from Wednesday showed the river’s banks were already flooded.

In a statement, the iconic museum said measures had also been taken to protect the building itself and there was a preventative system in place to ensure artworks could be quickly evacuated if necessary.

People in house boats along the river were forced to improvise bridges to get to dry land, as seen in the epa images.

 

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