|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Latin America (Click here for more)

Experts Foresee Promising Future for Spanish, Although Not Free of Challenges

BUENOS AIRES – A “promising future” awaits Spanish, although not one free of challenges presented by the social networks, other “dominant” languages or the many variants of the language around the world, according to experts at the close of the 6th Latin American Translation and Interpretation Congress.

“A language that has about 500 million speakers has only a promising future,” said Argentine Academy of Letters chief Jose Luis Moure, one of five experts participating in the final discussion forum moderated by Buenos Aires Public Translators College president Leticia Martinez.

For Argentine academic and writer Alicia Zorrilla, “the language’s future is magnificent because Spanish is a language that is loved more and more each day,” but its speakers must “fight so that we don’t let ourselves be eaten up by foreign languages.”

One of the challenges, she said, is the ever greater level of “hybridization” of Spanish due to the contributions each Spanish-speaking country makes.

“The important thing is to preserve the unity of the syntax. Each country has its vocabulary and its norms. We must preserve the syntax so that we all understand each other,” she said, adding that she was concerned by the “errors” in Spanish that predominate on the social networks.

BBVA Foundation chief Joaquin Müller-Thyssen said he was not so worried about that, since “it’s being written more than ever. I really admire how well many people write. Others don’t. But I wouldn’t rend my garment over the current situation of Spanish in that regard.”

He said, however, that he believed that “the future of Spanish will undoubtedly be linked to the economic position of the Spanish-speaking community.

The four-day congress at the Palais Rouge featured discussions among experts, students and language professionals on the current and future situation of the Spanish language translator.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2018 © All rights reserved