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  HOME | Latin America (Click here for more)

Japanese Study Says Latin America Leads Fight against Gender Gap

TOKYO – A group of Japanese academics launched the “21st Century Latin American Society,” a book on women’s participation in politics, which says the region leads in the fight against gender gap.

The book, written entirely in Japanese, was launched Tuesday at the Instituto Cervantes in Tokyo.

Around 20 university professors, after a three-year research, concluded that presence of women in positions of responsibility is “fairly high” in 90 percent of Latin American countries.

Academic Iyo Kunimoto highlighted the case of Nicaragua saying it has the world’s highest participation of women in politics.

“Latin America is a region that has had the most success in establishing policies against gender gap,” she explained to EFE, underlining the recent evolution in a region with “a long tradition of chauvinist culture.”

Kunimoto, an honorary professor at Tokyo’s Chuo University, advocated a quota for women to promote their presence in positions of power, a pro-woman law that has been adopted in countries such as “Mexico, Panama, Nicaragua and Bolivia.”

“In places like Bolivia women have been very active and have won their place and involved themselves in politics. In Japan, however, no one wants to participate in demonstrations,” she remarked, lauding women’s activism in Latin America.

However, she also pointed out that femicide is present in countries in the region, especially Mexico, although it is rare in Japan.

The book launch was a collaboration between Instituto Cervantes in Tokyo and the embassies of Dominican Republic, Argentina, Colombia, El Salvador, Mexico and Panama in Japan.

 

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