|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Venezuela (Click here for more Venezuela news)

Venezuela Releases 44 Political Prisoners, 300+ Remain
Forces them to acknowledge disputed power

By Carlos Camacho

CARACAS -- The embattled Nicolas Maduro administration has so far released 44 political prisoners, but not before first forcing them to kow-tow before the Constituent Assembly, the supra-Constitutional power some of them are in jail for denouncing as fraudulent.

Tareck William Saab, the Attorney General imposed by the Constituent, promised to free more than 90 political prisoners Saturday, while Constituent chief Delcy Rodriguez said some 80 prisoners would be freed.

"#25Dec 6:00pm This is the list of 44 #PoliticalPrisoners freed (with restrictions) from Dec 23 up until now", tweeted lawyer Alfredo Romero Monday afternoon. Romero is the head of the prisoners' rights NGO "Foro Penal", an entity that drafts the list of Venezuelan political prisoners under Maduro recognized by the Organization of American States and other entities.

Another "Foro Penal" lawyer, Gonzalo Himiob, defined the releases as "bittersweet freedom", in an article he penned Monday for the Run Runes news site.

According to Romero's list, more than 300 political prisoners remain in Maduro's jails, some of them jailed without a trial since 2014.

Prisoners were bused from the national intelligence service SEBIN-operated prison "El Helicoide" to the Foreign Ministry in front of the Constituent, which the opposition, the United States and most countries of the world agree was fraudulently constituted. There they were threatened with community service and forced to admit transgressions before being remanded to house arrest.

None of them was ever tried or formally charged. Not even Alfredo Romero, a Lara state mayor who had Constitutional protection as an elected official.

The proceedings were broadcast live on state television. Venezuela has long maintained it did not have political prisoners, saying there were only "politicians in prison".

Venezuela had few political prisoners before Maduro took over in 2013. That situation soon changed in 2014, when the country experienced a violent cycle of anti-Maduro protests: the National Guard soon rounded up more than 3,000 demonstrators that year.

Killings of demonstrators also became a Maduro habit, first in 2014 and again in 2017. Some 200 demonstrators have been killed since 2014.

With negotiations between the government and the opposition set to resume in January 2018 and after snatching almost all state and city governments in elections the opposition again deemed as fraudulent, Maduro has been trying to get U.S.-imposed sanctions lifted.

All of the prisoners freed will now endure house arrest, a gag order on all statements to the press, an electronic ankle bracelet for monitoring and have to present themselves before a court at least once a month.





 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2018 © All rights reserved