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  HOME | Mexico

Over 27,000 People Missing in Mexico, Government Says

MEXICO CITY – A government database exists listing the names of more than 27,000 people classified as missing as of November 2012, when the previous presidential administration ended, a high-level official said Thursday.

The database lists 27,523 people who have not been located, Deputy Government Secretary for Judicial Affairs and Human Rights Lia Limon told MVS radio.

Limon said she did not know the database’s specific contents and only learned about it from an “executive summary” prepared by the National Center for Planning, Analysis and Intelligence to Fight Crime, or CENAPI.

The center is the intelligence unit of the federal Attorney General’s Office.

The summary “reports the existence of a list with the cited figure” on disappeared people, Limon said.

The contents of the database, which was created during the 2006-2012 administration of President Felipe Calderon, will be revealed next week, Limon said.

The official did not say if it was known why these people disappeared or whether they were victims of drug traffickers or kidnappers, were missing persons or went missing at the hands of authorities.

Congress approved legislation in March 2012 requiring the federal government to create a database of missing or disappeared people in an effort to investigate complaints.

The war on drugs launched by Calderon left about 70,000 people dead in Mexico, the government says.

Mexican press tallies estimate that about 12,000 people died in violent incidents linked to organized crime groups in 2012. EFE


 

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