|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Business & Economy (Click here for more)

College Costs Blamed for Keeping Minorities in Poverty

DENVER – Going to college has become a losing proposition for a growing number of minority youth in Colorado who find themselves burdened with student debt in an economy that is short on good-paying jobs.

“I know several people, including two very close friends, who ... have degrees, but also have a lot of debt and because they can’t find work, they end up mowing lawns,” Jason Chavez, a business administration student at a Denver university, told Efe.

“They earn the same as before (they went to college), but they have more debts. I don’t want that to happen to me,” he said.

To avoid such a fate, the 28-year-old Chavez put off going to college, chose a university that offers reduced tuition and continues to work “almost full-time” while taking classes.

Jason, who opens to start his own long-distance trucking company, is also putting away money in hopes of enabling his younger siblings to attend college full-time without working.

That goal, however, appears to be increasingly difficult to achieve in Colorado, according to the report Measuring Opportunities for Working Families, released Thursday by the Bell Policy Center, a nonpartisan social science research organization.

Though the state’s unemployment and poverty rates are slightly below the national averages, the number of Colorado working families living below the poverty line swelled by nearly 50 percent from 2004 to 2012.

“As changes in the job market have made some level of post-secondary education and training more essential, higher education has become significantly less affordable and less accessible to low-income families,” the report notes.

The relatively low numbers of minority adults pursuing post-secondary education “highlight a serious weakness in Colorado’s educational system and are indicative of the institutional barriers and competitive disadvantages low-income and minority Coloradans face in attempting to achieve self-sufficiency and upward economic mobility,” the authors say. EFE


 

 

Xbox Live Gratuit
Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2009 © All rights reserved