|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Science, Nature & Technology

Fish Species 110 Million Years Old Found in Mexico

SAN CRISTOBAL DE LAS CASAS, Mexico – Mexican scientists have discovered fossils of two fish species that lived some 110 million years ago during the Cretaceous period in what is today the southeastern state of Chiapas, officials said.

The two new fossils were given the scientific names of Pepemkay maya and Zoqueichthys carolinae in honor of the Mayan and Zoque cultures in that southeastern part of the country, Chiapas state’s Environment and Natural History Secretariat said Thursday.

The director of paleontology of the state agency, Marco Antonio Coutiño, said the fossils were submitted to various studies to determine their characteristics, adding that both belong to the monophylum Acanthomorpha “to which almost a third of vertebrates belong that are living today.”

He added that the specimens were found in the El Chango community in the central Chiapas municipality of Ocozocoautla de Espinosa, where a large number of fossils have been found.

“Pepemkay maya has a skull without spines, a dorsal fin with five spines and eight soft ligaments, while the Zoqueichthys carolinae differs from the other by having a flat crest, and its pelvic and pectoral fins are shaped by 8 and 12 soft ligaments, respectively, Bruno Than Marchese, head of the secretariat’s paleontological collection, said.

He said that the new discovery of these species, which have also been found in Croatia, Britain, Israel, Italy, Lebanon, Morocco and Portugal as well as in the Antarctic, qualifies Chiapas as a “land of megadiversity in prehistoric times.” EFE


 

 

Xbox Live Gratuit
Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2009 © All rights reserved