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  HOME | Mexico

Mexico’s Incoming President Proposes Anti-Corruption Commission

MEXICO CITY – President-elect Enrique Peña Nieto announced Wednesday that he will soon send to Mexico’s Congress a pair of bills to create a National Anti-corruption Commission and to shift responsibility for public safety back to the interior ministry.

Peña Nieto said that both proposals seek to improve the effectiveness of the public administration and fight corruption “at all levels of government.”

The president-elect, who will take office on Dec. 1, said that his aim is to reduce from 18 to 16 the number of Cabinet-level departments.

He explained that the reform will mean the disappearance of the Public Administration Secretariat, whose functions will be divided among the new anti-corruption commission and other departments.

His proposal to return responsibility for law and order to the Government Secretariat – the equivalent of the interior ministry in other Latin American countries – would imply the elimination of the Public Safety Secretariat, created in 2000.

With regard to the National Anti-corruption Commission, Peña Nieto said that the idea is for it to be a “strictly impartial entity” and with the capacity to act on its own initiative or according to the requirements of other state bodies or public complaints.

It would be charged with investigating both corrupt officials and individuals “who intend to benefit” from corruption.

Peña Nieto’s Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, held a monopoly on political power at the national level from 1929-2000 and its tenure was marked by numerous cases of corruption. EFE


 

 

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