|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Central America

Guatemala’s Maya Indians Celebrate Start of Year 5127

GUATEMALA CITY – Maya Indians in Guatemala celebrated Tuesday the beginning of the year 5127, prophesied to be marked by a “change of authority.”

“For peace, for harmony, for the unity of peoples,” the Maya priests and spiritual leaders prayed as they danced around the fire, took their places at the four cardinal points and invoked the gods to bring “the dawn of better times.”

Though the festivities are celebrated at dozens of spots the Indians consider sacred, the main ceremony, in which government representatives and leaders of the chief indigenous communities take part, is held at Kaminal Juyu, west of the capital.

These ceremonies mark the end of Wayeb, a five-day period during which the Mayas reflect on all that occurred during the year just ended, and define their goals and actions to be taken in the new year.

The year 5127, according to the Mayan worldview, is governed by Kab’lajuj E, or 12th Road, which represents the “change of authority” in the new time, the path forward and the destiny of peoples.

“What the sacred book Popol Wuj predicts and what is actually going to happen this year in Guatemala is not a simple coincidence, but rather a guide, an orientation and a hope,” Juan Axtij, one of the Indian elders taking part in the ceremony, told Efe.

The old man was alluding to the general elections set for September, when Guatemalans will elect their president and vice president, 158 members of Congress and 333 mayors.

Indigenous people represent 42 percent of the 14.4 million inhabitants of Guatemala.

In the past two decades, Indians have recovered much of their culture after it was in danger of being exterminated by the military repression of the 1960-1996 civil war.

The Mayan calendar, considered one of the most exact and sophisticated mechanisms for measuring time known to man, has a year of 365 days, but with the difference that it is divided into 18 months of 20 days each, plus the Wayeb. EFE
 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2019 © All rights reserved