|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Venezuela (Click here for more Venezuela news)

Chavez Promises $1 Billion to Build 25,000 Houses in Caracas

CARACAS – Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez announced that he will order $1 billion invested in the construction of “at least 25,000 homes” in Caracas as part of his government’s efforts to move the city’s poorest residents out of the capital’s at-risk zones.

Chavez, at a press conference for foreign journalists, said that he will take the funds from the $20 billion loan extended by China in exchange for a guaranteed supply of Venezuelan oil.

With $1 billion, he said, “we can make at least 25,000 homes.”

The president also asked the National Assembly “to work on a special law” to confront the housing deficit “as a state problem” in Venezuela.

“I want to directly assume that responsibility,” Chavez said, adding that he would continue urging the private sector to build and sell houses at “fair” prices.

Chavez said that he conceived the project to build at least 25,000 houses in the capital after the deaths of at least 14 people over the past week, after their rickety dwellings collapsed due to heavy rains that have drenched Caracas.

Last Friday, the president admitted that one of the “debts” his government owes to the country after his 11 years in office is “the gigantic” problem of the housing deficit.

Venezuela is facing a deficit of about 2 million housing units, and the Venezuelan Construction Chamber says that the country needs to construct some 200,000 units annually to overcome the situation.

In 2009, 98,000 housing units were built nationwide, but this year that figure could fall to 60,000 because of investment problems and the scarcity of basic construction materials such as cement and steel, the chamber says on its Web site.

Chavez said last week that building “small earthquake-proof buildings” in those areas of Caracas would result in “lowering the (population) density” of the city’s hillsides, where millions of poor Venezuelans have erected shacks and other rudimentary housing.

The president, over the past four years, has appointed about eight ministers in the housing area in a so-far-failed attempt to reduce the housing deficit.

In recent years, he has also signed agreements with partner countries to build low-cost housing, but the rate of progress on those projects has never been officially revealed.

Chavez nationalized the cement industry in April 2008 amid repeated complaints that the government’s housing construction plans were being delayed due to the shortfall in that essential material, a situation that allegedly had resulted from the fact that cement-makers were exporting the majority of their production.

The president’s announcement came one day after the Venezuelan legislative elections, in which his United Socialist Party of Venezuela saw its majority in the national legislature fall below the two-thirds mark. EFE
 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2019 © All rights reserved