|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Arts & Entertainment

Remains of Nobleman, Slave Discovered in Pompei



ROME – The remains of two men, a nobleman aged between 30 and 40 and his slave, have been discovered by archaeologists in Pompei, an ancient Roman city that was destroyed by a massive volcanic eruption, the heads of the Pompeii Archaeological Park said in a statement on Saturday.

The archeologists have reconstructed the findings in such detail that it is possible to distinguish that the first was wearing a wool cape and the second a short tunic.

The two bodies, who died when the city was engulfed in the sudden eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD, were found in a side space of the cryptoporticus, in the noble part of the suburban villa of Civita Giuliana, a majestic estate from the era of the Emperor Augustus, which boasted rooms and balconies overlooking the sea.

The land is located about 700 meters outside Pompei’s walls. It was here in 2017 that archaeologists found the remains of three horses in the stables, with their saddles and harnesses.

The cryptoporticus allowed access to the upper floor and was a space of about 2.20 high of the year but whose length is unknown for the moment, and had a wooden floor as indicated by the presence in the walls of six holes to house the beams that supported a gallery, the official statement said.

Experts used an ancient technique of making molds with plaster to reconstruct the bodies of the victims, which consists of introducing a liquid plaster into the cavities of the bone remains of the inhabitants of the ancient Roman city.

They have managed to restore the shape of the bodies and observe that the first victim was a “young man, between 18 and 23/25 years old, about 156 cm high,” wearing a short tunic, and with visible signs showing that he had done “heavy work,” which scientists and experts in Pompeii presume was a slave.

The second man was between “30 and 40 years old and about 162 cm high,” and was wearing a long tunic or a wool cape, said the statement.

Both were in a supine position, with their hands on their chests, and with clothes that can be distinguished to the folds, a finding which the Italian Minister of Culture, Dario Franceschini, described as “amazing.”

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2020 © All rights reserved