|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Mexico

Mexican President Determined to Outlaw Outsourcing

MEXICO CITY – Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador said on Wednesday that he remains committed to passing legislation that would bar outsourcing, which he said facilitates more than 21 billion pesos ($900 million) annually in tax evasion.

“We have been trying, but there are some who don’t help,” he said during his daily morning press conference. “There are many responsible business-owners, but there are others – and, in the strictest – they are not even business-owners, they are coyotes (a slang term for smugglers), influence-traffickers.”

In January, the leftist president, popularly known as AMLO, created an interagency task force to address subcontracting irregularities blamed for some 380,000 job losses in 2019.

The Labor and Social Provisioning Secretariat reported the existence of 6,000 firms in Mexico that engage in “abusive subcontracting” involving five million workers.

“When the (COVID-19) pandemic began, we came to know of many workers who were being fired without any recognition of their rights,” AMLO told reporters Wednesday at the National Palace.

The government’s stated intention of eliminating outsourcing prompted a warning from Coparmex, Mexico’s most powerful business federation.

“Subcontracting is a modality of labor relation that should be preserved. Many companies carry out that activity legally. The president’s threat to promote an initiative to prohibit ‘outsourcing’ would imply the loss of millions of jobs,” Coparmex chief Gustavo de Hoyos said in a statement.

Pledging to take those concerns into account, AMLO said that he wants to enact regulations that unscrupulous operators “cannot circumvent again,” insisting that every person in formal employment should receive a “just salary” and be registered with the social security administration (IMSS).

Only 59 percent of Mexico’s roughly 20 million formal jobs are permanent positions, while the remainder are temporary, the president said, citing IMSS data.

Some firms, he said, make it a practice to lay off employees at the end of the year to avoid paying benefits and rehire the same people in January without any seniority.

Outsourcing became established in Mexico following the overhaul of labor law enacted in 2012 by rightist President Felipe Calderon.

“It was abused,” AMLO said on Wednesday of the law. “They are the so-called structural reforms, which were not done thinking about the benefit of workers, not done thinking about the benefit of the people. They were done thinking about the benefit of one group, a minority.”

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2020 © All rights reserved