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  HOME | Peru

Hidden Center of Inca Culture Now on Mobile Devices for All the World to See

VILCASHUAMAN, Peru – The blend of colonial and Inca cultures that is the village of Vilcashuaman in southern Peru seeks to become known to the world on social networks following the arrival of high-speed Internet on mobile devices that will provide immediate worldwide coverage of this faraway area hidden in the Andes.

To attract more national and international visitors, Vilcashuaman will use the village’s new connections to 3G and 4G mobile networks starting this week to promote its main tourist attractions based on its great historical and architectural legacy.

Vilcashuaman preserves with pride the remains of what five centuries ago was an important city of the Inca Empire and one of the crossroads of the Qhapaq Ñan, the great Inca Road network that connected all the provinces of a country that spread from southern Colombia to northern Argentina and Chile.

An imposing statue of the Inca Pachacutec, a leader of the largest empire of the pre-Columbian Americas, symbolizes the origin of the village from where it stands in the main plaza in front of the church of St. John the Baptist, built in the 16th century over the Temple of the Sun, a large construction of fine Inca masonry.

“We want to promote our archaeological site both nationally and internationally. It might not be as well known as other historical sites, but now we’re going to spread the word about it,” Agliberto Martinez, mayor of the Provincial Municipality of Vilcashuaman, told EFE.

For that reason the celebration took place with an orchestra playing in the village this Monday, to mark the activation of Movistar’s high-speed mobile networks, as part of the Internet for Everyone (IPT) project by Telefonica, which seeks to bring 3G and 4G to places in Latin America that they haven’t yet reached.

“In every district of the province we have archaeological sites and both national and international visitors need greater Internet coverage to find them faster,” Martinez said.

The festive inauguration was accompanied by the launch of a page on Facebook entitled “Vilcashuaman Is Waiting for You,” so that local authorities can begin promoting tourism in this village practically unknown to the rest of the world.

And now the locals of Vilcashuaman can engage in videoconferences and send e-mails from the same place that 500 years ago the “chasquis” (messengers) ran the Inca Road to take messages to people around the ancient Inca Empire.

 

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