|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Paraguay

Paraguay Plans to Scrap Tax on Conscientious Objectors

ASUNCION – The Paraguayan government announced on Monday that this year it will propose a reform to the 1975 law establishing compulsory military service for all males that will include repealing the tax levied on conscientious objectors who decline to serve in the armed forces.

The announcement was made Defense Minister Gen. Bernardino Soto, after a meeting with National Ombud Miguel Angel Godoy and members of Congress’ Standing Committee.

“Although it’s true that the military taxes were used for a time to improve the infrastructure situation in the barracks, for some time they have not been generating additional resources due to the impossibility of forcing them to be paid,” the minister said.

Enacted in 1975 during the 1954-1989 dictatorship of Gen. Alfredo Stroessner, the law requires all males between the ages of 17 and 20 to do military service for a period usually ranging from 30 to 90 days.

In 2010, Paraguay adopted legislation establishing the right of conscientious objectors to refuse military service on religious or ethical grounds.

“There is no way to coerce a young person to do military service or to pay the military tax. A law that does not have a specific punishment is a dead letter,” Soto said.

The defense minister also denied that “roundups” of young people to sign up for military service were being conducted and accused people on social media of creating a “situation of psychosis” in recent weeks.

According to the information provided by the minister, the budget for compulsory military service only allows 4,067 young people to participate in the training next year.

Meanwhile, Godoy acknowledged that the National Conscientious Objection Council is working to prepare over the next six months the appropriate public agreements allowing objectors to perform community service in lieu of military training.

Late last month, hundreds of youths stood in line for hours outside a government office in Asuncion to apply for recognition as conscientious objectors amid a mobilization against conscription.

The heightened interest came after statements by conservative President Mario Abdo Benitez praising mandatory military service.

“I have signed the authorization for my son Santiago to do Mandatory Military Service. I’m proud that he can serve his country with patriotism. I’m convinced it will be an experience that will serve him for the rest of his life,” the president wrote on Twitter.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2019 © All rights reserved