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  HOME | Peru

Rights Group Decries Situation of Indigenous People in Peru

LIMA – River pollution in the Amazon rainforest and education gaps affecting the some 55 indigenous communities in Peru are a few of the problems denounced in a report presented on Monday by the National Human Rights Coordination (CNDDHH).

The document is to be submitted to the International Labor Organization (ILO), a UN agency that monitors compliance of signatory governments with Convention 169, a document codifying the rights of indigenous peoples.

“We want to submit this alternative report on Peru’s compliance with Convention 169 to the ILO’s Committee of Experts in Geneva ,” Luis Hallazi, head of the CNDDHH bureau for indigenous people, told EFE, adding that he hopes to get the organization to demand that the country meet the criteria in a hearing in November.

The report analyzes an assertion made by the third indigenous community census – which the organization believes to have been incorrectly carried out last year – that as many as 25 percent of Peruvians identify as members of an indigenous people.

The report also denounces several cases of pollution of rivers and various other water sources in the Peruvian Amazonia, including an oil spill in 2016 in the Chiriaco region, which greatly affected the health of dozens of Awajun communities.

The CNDDHH also decried the government’s poor job at reducing education and health gaps, especially in the case of indigenous women, of whom the organization said only 31 percent reach secondary school.

Hallazi said that the implementation of Convention 169, which took effect more than 20 years ago in Peru, is “very deficient.”

 

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