|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Peru

Peru’s Multi-Colored Potato Varieties Solution to Malnourishment, Anemia

CUZCO, Peru – Largely unknown outside of the Andes, the region’s many multi-colored potato species may aid in preventing malnourishment and cancer, Peruvian researchers told EFE on Wednesday.

In their facility in Zurite, in the Andean region of Cuzco, scientists with Peru’s National Institute for Agrarian Innovation (INIA) are doing research on the myriad native potato varieties growing on mountainside terraces built by ancient Peruvian civilizations some 3,400 meters (11,200 feet) above sea level.

Their goal is to study the characteristics and benefits of each of the many potato breeds cultivated by the ancient Incas and classify them, as well as to develop new varieties that can be grown on a larger scale.

“To us, it’s a privileged place, as it has a history of more than 3,000 years of development,” INIA researcher Ladislao Palomino told EFE. “It was built by Pre-Incan civilizations, who left us a very important legacy, setting the bar very high, but I think we can surpass it.”

INIA has obtained as many as 26 new potato breeds that possess the characteristics of their native counterparts, including resilience to climate change – due to their high phenol content – and a more appealing shape and size, as well as their “high amounts of calories and proteins.”

“We don’t feel we’re developing a food that just fills the stomach,” Palomino said of the potatoes, the colors of which range from purple and black to red and orange. “(Potatoes) also protect against degenerative illnesses, such as cancer, because of the antioxidants they contain.”

INIA is currently exploring the commercial possibilities the potato has to offer.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2018 © All rights reserved