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  HOME | Latin America (Click here for more)

Expert: Garment Industry Contributes to Water Pollution in Peru, Brazil

MONTEVIDEO – The textile industry in Peru and Brazil is a contributing factor in water pollution, a Spanish consultant on the relationship of fashion to human rights told EFE on Friday.

Eduardo Iracheta, who traveled to Montevideo for the international fashion event MOLA, pointed to a “lack of transparency in manufacturing processes” in Latin America.

“There are many, many factories in Peru,” and a significant number of those facilities operate off-the-books, Iracheta said.

The consultant’s organization, Iracheta.es, is collecting data in Latin America to help achieve a more sustainable industry.

On Saturday, Iracheta will speak at MOLA about the human right to water.

“There are studies that show that there will be a water crisis within the next 10 years that will result in a humanitarian crisis,” he said. “And the fashion industry has very impacts on water use and water pollution.”

To illustrate, Iracheta said that some 2,700 liters (713 gallons) of water are required to manufacture a white T-shirt, while producing a pair of jeans consumes the equivalent of 285 showers.

Iracheta also said that companies are seldom held accountable for dumping polluted water into rivers, insisting that the private sector should “play its part” in combating water pollution.

He also encouraged consumers to question where and how their garments are made.

 

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