|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Brazil (Click here for more)

Security Forces to Remain in Rio until 2018, Temer Says

BRASILIA – Brazilian President Michel Temer said on Sunday that the troops which have been deployed to contain the violence and reinforce security in the crime-stricken state of Rio de Janeiro will remain there until 2018.

Temer said in a video released on social networks that there is an extensive security program for Rio de Janeiro, which will remain in force until Dec. 31, 2017 and will be extended to 2018.

Organized criminal groups that act against this decision will be met with a strong response from authorities, said the president, who on Sunday met the President of the Chamber of Deputies of Brazil, Rodrigo Maia, to discuss the matter.

Temer also recalled that the national security plan has “broader” actions.

Maia, on the other hand, described the fight against organized crime in Rio de Janeiro as “fundamental” and highlighted the police operations that will continue to dismantle criminal gangs and reduce crime in the city.

Maia also reiterated the importance of recovering and rehabilitating young people who are involved in drug-trafficking syndicates, adding that social policies are required.

The messages from Temer and Maia came a day after the Brazilian government mobilized more than 5,000 army and police personnel to favelas in the north and west of Rio de Janeiro, which is a new measure against cargo-theft-related crimes in the area.

For the third time in a year, the increasing crime and violence in Rio led the Brazilian government to mobilize up to 10,000 soldiers and security agents from other states to Rio.

The serious economic crisis that stifles the state of Rio has resulted in higher levels of insecurity, with an average of 20 victims of violence a day and about 93 policemen killed so far in 2017.

From January to March, Rio suffered about 1,870 murders.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2015 © All rights reserved