|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Bolivia

Bolivian Government Reports Death Threats against President

LA PAZ – President Evo Morales has received death threats on his @evoespueblo Twitter account from two users who posted violent and racist messages, the Bolivian government said on Monday.

“In the last few hours, we have noticed direct threats in the president’s Twitter account against his life,” Communications Minister Gisela Lopez said.

The threats were found in anonymous accounts, one created under the screen name “saimon” @andresvilar1949 and the other with the name “Exorcismo Bebe” (Exorcism Baby) @ExorcismooHN, Lopez said.

Lopez blamed the threatening messages on what she labeled the national and international “radical right,” adding that the posts were reactions to the president’s expression of political opinions online.

Morales’s Twitter account was created in April 2016 and he has 194,000 followers.

In recent posts, Morales criticized the building of fences and walls to stop immigration, while defending the concept of “universal citizenship” and denouncing invasions.

In March 2016, the government reported alleged threats against Morales posted on his Facebook page.

Last December, authorities said a 17-year-old woman had contacted the US Embassy in La Paz, volunteering to attack Morales in exchange for protection for her and her family.

The US Embassy alerted the Bolivian government about the threat, but authorities have not disclosed the results of the investigation.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2015 © All rights reserved