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  HOME | Society (Click here for more)

Japanese Emperor’s Eldest Granddaughter to Marry University Mate

TOKYO – The eldest granddaughter of the Japanese emperor will marry a friend from her university in Tokyo, Japanese news channel NHK reported Tuesday.

Princess Mako, 25, is likely to marry Kei Komuro, a resident of the Yokohama locality, in 2018, NHK news added.

Mako is the eldest daughter of Japanese prince, Akishino, who is Emperor Akihito’s second son and second in line to the Chrysanthemum Throne after Prince Naruhito.

Of late, the princess has been representing the country internationally; she visited Paraguay in September 2016 to participate at an event to commemorate the 80th anniversary of the arrival of the first Japanese immigrants in Paraguay.

Mako’s marriage will further shrink Japan’s imperial family, an aged and dwindling institution, which is heading towards a huge generational gap.

The law that has been governing the royal household since 1947 doesn’t recognize the so-called collateral institutional branches, making women who marry out of royalty to lose their royal status.

The world’s oldest reigning hereditary dynasty comprises 19 members, out of which only four are men, making them the only ones who can accede to the throne: Emperor Akihito (83), Prince Naruhito (57), Prince Akishino (51) and Prince Hisahito (10), younger brother of Princess Mako.

 

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