|
|
|
|
Search: 
Latin American Herald Tribune
Venezuela Overview
Venezuelan Embassies & Consulates Around The World
Sites/Blogs about Venezuela
Venezuelan Newspapers
Facts about Venezuela
Venezuela Tourism
Embassies in Caracas

Colombia Overview
Colombian Embassies & Consulates Around the World
Government Links
Embassies in Bogota
Media
Sites/Blogs about Colombia
Educational Institutions

Stocks

Commodities
Crude Oil
US Gasoline Prices
Natural Gas
Gold
Silver
Copper

Euro
UK Pound
Australia Dollar
Canada Dollar
Brazil Real
Mexico Peso
India Rupee

Antigua & Barbuda
Aruba
Barbados
Cayman Islands
Cuba
Curacao
Dominica

Grenada
Haiti
Jamaica
Saint Kitts and Nevis
Saint Lucia
Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Belize
Costa Rica
El Salvador
Honduras
Nicaragua
Panama

Bahamas
Bermuda
Mexico

Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Uruguay

What's New at LAHT?
Follow Us On Facebook
Follow Us On Twitter
Most Viewed on the Web
Popular on Twitter
Receive Our Daily Headlines


  HOME | Colombia (Click here for more)

Colombia’s President Unveils Measures to Combat Corruption

BOGOTA – Colombia’s president on Wednesday announced a package of measures to combat corruption, including proposed legislation aimed at protecting whistleblowers.

Juan Manuel Santos made his remarks in a speech at the “Corruption in Colombia: The Worst Form of Violence” forum in Bogota.

“Now that we’ve ended the conflict with the FARC (the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia guerrilla group), we must all wage this other difficult and complex, but equally necessary, battle,” Santos said.

The measures include strengthening an anti-corruption unit within the National Police’s Directorate of Criminal Investigation and Interpol (DIJIN) and providing more tools to entities responsible for overseeing different areas of the economy.

Other measures will include assigning special judges to hear cases involving crimes against public administration and requiring that payments to government contractors be made entirely through the banking system.

Corruption is one of the main obstacles to progress in Colombia, according to Santos, who stressed that violent crimes such as forced displacement, as well as “dozens of massacres, targeted killings and the rape of thousands of women, have been the price of that show of human treachery.”

The president said the interaction between violence and corruption also was seen in the struggle for control of areas that contain mineral wealth or are used to grow coca, the raw material of cocaine.

“Some officials leverage their positions of responsibility to facilitate, by action or omission, illegal mining production or drug trafficking in their territories, thereby strengthening criminal mafias,” Santos said.

Lastly, he referred to Brazilian construction giant Odebrecht, which along with its petrochemical unit Braskem pleaded guilty late last year to paying hundreds of millions of dollars in bribes to government officials and political parties in a number of countries – including Colombia – to win business.

As part of a settlement reached with authorities in the United States, Brazil and Switzerland, those companies agreed to pay a combined total penalty of at least $3.5 billion.

Santos reiterated that his administration was committed to learning the full extent of the corruption schemes that Odebrecht operated in Colombia.

 

Enter your email address to subscribe to free headlines (and great cartoons so every email has a happy ending!) from the Latin American Herald Tribune:

 

Copyright Latin American Herald Tribune - 2005-2015 © All rights reserved