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  HOME | Central America

Neopanamax Vessel No. 1,000 Passes Through Widened Panama Canal

PANAMA CITY – The MSC Anzu container ship, with a capacity of 9,008 TEUs (20-foot containers), passed through the newly widened Panama Canal on Sunday, becoming the 1,000th vessel to do so since the expanded waterway was inaugurated in June 2016.

“The 1,000th transit of the widened canal reaffirms the value of the route and the confidence of the maritime industry in our service,” said the Panama Canal Authority (ACP) on its Twitter account on Sunday.

The ACP said that the MSC Anzu was built in 2015 and measures 300 meters (984 feet) in length and 48.23 m (158 feet) in breadth.

“The MSC Anzu docked at the Panamanian Pacific ports to unload and load cargo,” the Canal administration added.

Some 6 percent of world commerce passes through the Canal each year.

The ACP said that the newly revamped Canal, inaugurated on June 26, 2016, after a decade of construction, is “restructuring world maritime commerce.”

Expanding the Canal cost at least $5.45 billion and the waterway can now accommodate vessels three times the size of those that could utilize it when it was first opened in 1914.

Last month, the Panama Canal hit another milestone, achieving its third consecutive tonnage record by accommodating “a daily average of 1.18 million tons” of shipping and the transit of 1,180 vessels.

 

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